Zero-Day vulnerability in Adobe products enables takeover of system

Looks like there is a new vulnerability out that affects Adobe Flash, Player and Acrobat reader. Exploit is out on the Internet. Attackers are able to take over your system if you open up infected files (flash, PDF etc).

From this Adobe advisory:

A critical vulnerability exists in Adobe Flash Player 10.0.45.2 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Solaris operating systems, and the authplay.dll component that ships with Adobe Reader and Acrobat 9.x for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX operating systems. This vulnerability (CVE-2010-1297) could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. There are reports that this vulnerability is being actively exploited in the wild against both Adobe Flash Player, and Adobe Reader and Acrobat.

There is no fix yet. Stay tuned.

Facebook “Un Named App” scare leads to malware

Excellent write up by Trendmicro on the ‘un named app’ discussion that is spreading on Facebook. If you search Google for this, you may be tricked into downloading Malware to your machine and get compromised.

Here is the article.

[…] Nothing to worry about here as far as your Facebook is concerned, this does not appear to be a genuine malicious app. In fact a thread on Yahoo answers appears to demonstrate in a reproducible fashion that “Un named App” is nothing more than your “Boxes” tab on your Facebook profile page.

Beware though, there is still real risk attached to this Chinese whisper. Criminals have picked up on the concern among Facebook users (or possibly they were responsible for starting the rumour?) and they have already started to poison Google search results.

Google search result:

Google search result

I queried Google for “facebook unnamed app” and the third result on the first page pointed to a malicious website set up for the purposes of distributing fake anti-virus software, this time called “Security Tool”. If you are unwary enough to click the link you will be presented with a dialogue box informing you that you have a huge number of infected files on your machine and prompting you to use Security Tool to clean them up. The software of course is no real security solution and is designed to fool the victim into parting with hard-earned cash.

Be careful what you surf for.

Vulnerability in Adobe Reader and Flash Player – remote break-ins possible

Be careful when you use Flash Player to watch videos on the Internet or in your E-mail; also don’t open PDF files from unknown sources. There is currently an exploit in the wild that makes use of a new vulnerability, which essentially can result in an attacker taking over your system. There is currently no patch for this; Adobe is working hard to get one out next week. Until then, be cautious!

See the details on Adobe’s site: 
http://www.adobe.com/support/security/advisories/apsa09-03.html

[…] A critical vulnerability exists in the current versions of Flash Player (v9.0.159.0 and v10.0.22.87) for Windows, Macintosh and Linux operating systems, and the authplay.dll component that ships with Adobe Reader and Acrobat v9.x for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX operating systems. This vulnerability (CVE-2009-1862) could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. There are reports that this vulnerability is being actively exploited in the wild via limited, targeted attacks against Adobe Reader v9 on Windows.
[…]
We are in the process of developing a fix for the issue, and expect to provide an update for Flash Player v9 and v10 for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux by July 30, 2009 (the date for Flash Player v9 and v10 for Solaris is still pending). We expect to provide an update for Adobe Reader and Acrobat v9.1.2 for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX by July 31, 2009 […] Flash Player users should exercise caution in browsing untrusted websites. Adobe is in contact with Antivirus and Security vendors regarding the issue and recommend users keep their anti-virus definitions up to date.

Conficker, week late, activated now

Conficker.C woke up recently. It can now also be referred to as Conficker.D / Conficker/D, Downadup.E, Downadup/D. It downloaded an update that most likely contains a key logger and other good stuff.

This Trend Micro article states:

Days after the April 1st activation date of Conficker, nothing interesting was seen so far in our Downad/Conficker monitoring system except the continuous checking of dates and times via Internet sites, checking of updates via HTTP, and the increasing P2P communications from the Conficker peer nodes.

Well that was until last night when we saw a new file (119,296 bytes) in the Windows Temp folder. Checking on the file properties reveals that the file was created exactly on April 7, 2009 at 07:41:21.

There may be some web traffic to a certain site, http://goodnewsdigital(dot)com, and some sites recommend blocking it, but this is difficult, as the Internet addresses that this site points to changes with every look up!

Best way of dealing with this: update your signatures of whatever Anti-Virus installation you have and scan all your machines ASAP.